San Diego Mesa College Health Services - Treatments

 

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Disease Treatment

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a disease than causes liver problems. The hepatitis A virus is found in the stool/feces of a person infected with hepatitis A. It is usually spread by close personal contact and sometimes by eating food or drinking water containing the hepatitis A virus. To be protected from the hepatitis A virus you will need to have 2 hepatitis A vaccine injections six months apart.

You may not obtain hepatitis A at our office if:

  1. You are allergic to yeast, latex, or any of the components of the vaccine. Ask your physician if you are unsure.
  2. Are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  3. Are currently ill or have a chronic immunosuppressive disease.
  4. Are taking any anticoagulant medication (blood thinner) or have a bleeding disorder.
  5. Had a prior reaction to a hepatitis vaccine or a related vaccine.
  6. Have been diagnosed with hepatitis A.
  7. Have ever been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease that causes liver problems. To be protected from the hepatitis B virus you will need to have 3 hepatitis B vaccine injections over a 6 month time period. Or prove that you have had the 3 injections. If you believe you had the injections bring your vaccination/ immunization record to our office. If you think you had the injections but have no record of them, then we can draw a hepatitis B titer - this is a blood test to check for immunity to hepatitis B. The hepatitis B titer cost is $9.00.

The Hepatitis B immunization series is as follows:

You will receive the first injection at your initial visit. The second injection is due 1 month later. The third injection is due 5 months after the first injection or no sooner than 4 months after the second injection.

You may not obtain hepatitis B at our office if:

  1. You are allergic to yeast, latex, or any of the components of the vaccine. Ask your physician if you are unsure.
  2. Are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  3. Are currently ill or have a chronic immunosuppressive disease.
  4. Are taking any anticoagulant medication (blood thinner) or have a bleeding disorder.
  5. Had a prior reaction to a hepatitis vaccine or a related vaccine.
  6. Have been diagnosed with hepatitis B.
  7. Have ever been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis

Influenza

Flu is caused by the influenza virus, which spreads from person to person through coughing or sneezing. So covering your nose or mouth with coughing or sneezing and hand washing is important! Flu viruses are always changing. So influenza vaccines are updated yearly from several strains of the influenza virus which is why you need an annual flu vaccine. It takes about 2 weeks for protection to develop after receiving the vaccine, and the protection can last up to 1 year.

You may not obtain influenza at our office if:

Allergic to eggs, gelatin, chicken, thimerisol, latex, or any components of the vaccine.

Tetanus and Diphtheria

Tetanus and diphtheria remain a public health treat in San Diego County. You need to prove that you have had this vaccine within the last 10 years. If you request the vaccine early (before 10 years), be aware that you may increase your risk of adverse/side effects. We ask that you search thoroughly for your immunization record or proof of your last tetanus vaccination before getting another injection.

You may not obtain tetanus and diphtheria at this office if:

  1. Prone to seizures or have a seizure disorder. Ask your physician.
  2. Allergic to eggs, gelatin, chicken, thimerisol, latex, or any components of the vaccine.
  3. Are pregnant or breastfeeding
  4. Are currently ill or have a chronic immunosuppressive disease.
  5. Are taking any anticoagulant medication (blood thinner) or have a bleeding disorder.
  6. Have had an allergic reaction or neurological reactions to any vaccination.
  7. Diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB), cancer or any illness that suppresses the immune system.
  8. Not sure if you have had the first 3 primary vaccinations of tetanus and diphtheria. If this is the case, you will need to see you physician for vaccination

Tuberculosis Information

Tuberculosis is a disease primarily of the lungs, although it can affect other areas of the body. It is usually an airborne disease transmitted. We test for TB by doing skin test to see if you have been exposed to the disease. This skin test is commonly called a PPD. It is a two step test. You will receive an injection just under the skin in your forearm at the first visit. Two days later at the same time of day or later in the day than the first step, you must return to have us read the test results. If you do not return in 48 to 72 hours the test is invalid. Then you must repeat the test and will be charged $8.00 again to be retest.

You will not be able to get the TB skin test in our office if:

  1. Have ever had a positive TB skin test during your lifetime. If you have we need to see the results of both your positive skin test and the follow up chest x-ray. The chest x-ray must have been done in the state of California.
  2. Are allergic to any of the components of the testing solution.
  3. Have ever had a severe reaction to the TB skin test.
  4. Are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  5. Are currently ill or have a chronic immunosuppressive disease. Are using any type of immunosuppressive medications, to include steroids, and chemotherapy. If you are unsure about your medications contact your physician. Have a positive HIV status or AIDS – please contact your physician.
  6. Have received measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), oral polio (OPV), Flu mist, or yellow fever vaccines within the last 6 weeks. If so, you may receive the TB skin test 6 weeks after the date of receiving the vaccination